Sulfanilamide Powder Packets

Sulfanilamide Powder Packets

Sulfanilamide Powder Packets

Paper

The original I have is made out of paper essentially the same as normal computer paper. It has yellowed quite a bit, but I am assuming that is age. Nonetheless it is best to avoid the super-glossy or super-bright computer paper. Cheap stuff works best.

Cutting

I used scissors to cut on the exterior outline. At the top there is a small section that dips below a horizontal line. Follow the dip (the horizontal line is a score line) Then take a single hole punch and punch out the three holes in the right panel.

Assembly

Score all the interior lines. Fold the right panel (with the hole punches) back so that it’s underneath. The inside of the left panel gets a stripe of glue and is folded back (so that it’s over the right panel). The bottom panel (patent pending) gets glue on the inside and is folded back. Here is the tricky part. Looking at the main body of text there are two flaps (a small one and a red one). The small flap will be glued down securely. The red flap gets only a spot or two of glue (so that it can be pulled up easily). The trick is that the two cannot really separate without tearing the paper, so they need to be glued simultaneously

Usage

These were copied from one found in a First Aid Packet, Carlisle Model. They contained 5 grams of a white crystalline powder (sulfalinamide). The purpose of the powder is to prevent infection, but because of how it was administered (externally) it may have had limited usefulness and may have even been harmful (introduction of foreign particles). Still, it was training and practice to apply the powder.

Notes

This is an easy reproduction since it doesn’t require any fancy paper. It’s also one of my favorites since it can be used during a reenactment. Normal table salt looks pretty close, but be sure to put it into the packet before you glue the flaps town. These could be used in conjunction with a wound card system by printing the wound card information (alive/dead/whatever) on the inside of the packet. The wound card information would then be unreadable until the sulfa was administered.

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15 Comments

  • ww2md says:

    I like the powder packets. Any chance of a morphine repo?

  • Taylor Dewey says:

    Morphine? Unlikely given how complex they are.

    I tried to order some nice looking ones from a fellow in the UK, but I never heard anything back.

    Anyone know of a good source for them these days?

    Disregard the above. You can order a nice looking morphine reproduction from med-dept.com.

  • Mike Collins says:

    any chance of the morphine box? for one syrette?

  • Nate says:

    Hey!! I found one a repro for $7 on WPG (what price glory) They look nice but being that im a creative kid I looked at a picture and used a repro label and some tin foil as well as a paperclip to make my own. I would post pictures or I can send one with insrtuctions to an email

  • Nate says:

    http://kitsune-studios.com/WWII/Collection/PaperWork/Medical/

    HERE YOU GO!!! THERES A WHOLE BUNCH!! Cardstock works best for the bandage boxes

  • Mike Collins says:

    I made a morphine syrette. and the box for a single one as wellback in March! I sized it right(for the most part) The mrphine syrette I made out of a paper clip, some paper(colored silver), a label I found, a pen tip(to keep its shape) a clear pen cartrage(for the cap) and pliers(to bend the tip inwards) threw it together in about 5 minutes. its on youtube with other homemade bandages and the helmet using your technique and instructions if you let, I could send the link.

    • Nate says:

      Yes please do!! I was using a paperclip and some tinfoil… that took about 30 seconds, but i use that website so much! The printouts are perfect for use in reenactments

    • Yensen says:

      it would be really nice if you sent like instructions, I’m young medic just starting out

  • Yensen says:

    please make instructions

  • Josh says:

    For the powder itself what could be used instead that has the same consistency as sulfa in wwii

    • Taylor Dewey says:

      I seem to recall ripping one open and finding something close to sugar or salt: white or off-white granulated substance.

      • Josh says:

        Thank you also do you or anyone know where i can find carlisle bandages not the tins or boxes but the actual dressings themselves either to buy or a site or somewhere where it shows how to make reproductions of the dressings themselves thanks again

  • Josh says:

    Also i have the black vials for the medic gear does anyone know where i could find the labels for these vials

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